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Glenbow Archives NA-1481-2
The tipi poles are carried by cart or truck to the site. In the past, poles would be dragged by horse and travois. NA-1481-6
Glenbow Archives NA-1481-6
Four poles are tied together with a rope and raised to form a stable foundation. The rope is firmly secured at the centre of the tipi.
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Glenbow Archives
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Poles are gradually added to the frame.
The door of the tipi faces east.
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Glenbow Archives NA-1481-9
Our tipis have a special number of poles in the framework. We alternate from each side as poles continue to be added.
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Glenbow Archives
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The top of the canvas tipi is tied to one pole which is raised into position at the back of the tipi frame. NA-1481-11
Glenbow Archives
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The canvas tipi is loosely pulled around the poles. The wooden pins or "buttons" are used to fasten the front of the tipi. The bottom edge is staked using black birch pegs. The poles are then pushed out from the interior to tighten the canvas cover.
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Glenbow Archives
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The tipi is now up. Big Tobacco's owl tipi at the Siksika Sun Dance, August 1961 NA-1481-1
Glenbow Archives NA-1481-1
Our tipis are the perfect home for the windy prairies. They are relatively lightweight, and can be easily moved.