This Week in Western Canadian History
January 2 - January 8
January
8
1814

The hostility between the Hudson's Bay Company and the North West Company increased when Miles MacDonell, Lord Selkirk's agent in the Red River Settlement, signed the Pemmican Proclamation on January 8, 1814. The proclamation banned the export of pemmican from the colony for a year. The intent of the ban was to ensure that there were sufficient provisions for the settlers expected to come to the colony in the summer, but the North West Company interpreted it as an attempt to deny necessary supplies to their canoe brigades.

January
8
1891

Upper Cochrane RanchErnest Cochrane of the Cochrane Ranche west of Calgary, reported severe losses of yearling cattle to a pack of wild wolves. Although he tried to poison the wolves, they refused to touch the dead animals Cochrane had laced with strychnine. The wolves were so large and so numerous that dogs refused to tackle the pack. Cochrane and his managers then attempted to shoot any of the creatures who advanced too close to the stock.

January
2
1912

Calgary’s New Public Library Calgary’s new public library opened for public inspection although not for business as books were still being placed on shelves and catalogue cards filed in drawers.Calgary’s New Public Library The new building (today’s Memorial Park Library) cost $100,000 and was largely financed by a grant from American industrialist Andrew Carnegie. It featured a reading room for younger readers and a general reading room with magazines and daily newspapers from around the country. The staff included Alexander Calhoun, the Librarian, and four assistants.

January
8
1912

Old General Hospital Dr. James Egbert prepared a scathing report on the conditions at Calgary's Isolation Hospital for infectious diseases. Due to the lack of funding there was inadequate heating in the wards and insufficient staff to clean the rooms. Patients complained that, although the nurses did their best in extremely difficult circumstances, they were forced to rely on visiting family members for care.

January
6
1921

As a new Jury Act was introduced into the Alberta Legislature, J.R. Boyle, the province's Attorney-General, affirmed that he saw no reason why women could not be selected to serve on juries. He identified only two major difficulties that required resolution: married women would naturally have to be exempt because of their household responsibilities, and separate facilities for men and women would have to be provided in major criminal cases which could last several days.

January
7
1926

The Canadian Reader Representatives of several parent-teachers associations met with Calgary school board officials to challenge the board's decision to charge students for their textbooks. Many parents protested that the fees imposed undue hardship on large families who might have several children in school. The school board maintained that textbooks were becoming outdated so quickly that the board could no longer afford to distribute new textbooks to all children each time a new one was approved. The only alternative to charging parents was to raise taxes, which in effect meant that all Calgarians were subsidizing these families.

January
7
1926

Residents of southern Alberta enjoyed a respite from winter’s cold as strong chinook winds raised temperatures from 8°F (-14°C) to 44°F (7°C), a difference of thirty-six degrees within a single day. The news was not all good, however, as the annual ice harvest was in jeopardy and several hockey games had to be cancelled when the rinks melted.

January
7
1942

New Car Brochure Local automobile dealers predicted that within days there would be no new cars available for sale in Calgary. Wartime regulations had reduced factory production and made transportation of non-military vehicles difficult so dealerships weren't able to bring in new stock. Although it wasn't known when new vehicles would be available, there was an adequate supply of used automobiles, particularly as so many young men were selling their cars when they enlisted for service overseas.

January
4
1954

The President of the University of Alberta in Edmonton confirmed that the University would host the western universities debating competition. The topic was, "the Kinsey reports are a benefit to society." The debate was originally scheduled to be held in Winnipeg, but was suspended when churches and public halls in that city refused to permit the discussion on their premises. Despite protests from some of his faculty, the University's President described the controversial Kinsey reports on human sexuality as public documents of social significance, and said he could find no reason that the students shouldn't discuss the topic if they wished.

January
6
1999

After intensive testing, Calgary medical authorities ruled that young patients could continue to keep their furbies with them while they spent time in hospital. There had been fears that the complex electronic toys were interfering with sensitive medical equipment but the vocal little creatures passed all of the tests and the charges against them were dropped.



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